Posts tagged with ‘functional’

  • Architecture Firm Designs Batcave-Inspired Carpark, Complete with Hidden Entrance, Under This Stately Manse

    By Core77 on September 11, 2015
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    Don't you hate it when your car collection outgrows the parking available at your 1930s-designed Georgian mansion? That was the problem faced by an unnamed homeowner in Melbourne, who contracted local architecture firm Molecule to solve the problem. On...
  • The Tarzan Boat Mobile Floating Water Park

    By Core77 on September 11, 2015
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    This is the most fun-looking thing I’ve seen all summer, but has one of the world’s worst soundtracks. Please turn your volume down before checking this out:

     

    That’s the Tarzan Boat, a “mobile floating water park” used by Navy SEALs for training. Okay, not really. It’s a recreational platform aimed at “resorts, marinas, camps, hotels and private dock owners,” and the manufacturers are calling it a moneymaker—not just for them, but for the buyer. They reckon the attraction will bring in “$3,000 to $5,000 a day,” and they aim to help you monetize yours:

     

    This isn't just a boat, it's a business ...and we want you to be very successful because it is our report card to the world.  We don't charge franchise fees or any payments after your purchase, so our reputation is based on your success and we are going to be diligent to make sure you are a hit.

     

    Remember, that Tarzan Boat is designed for commercial use, projected to gross $3,000-$5,000 a day.  We show you the operation of handling customers, payment, location, traffic flow, training your staff, free marketing methods and keeping your overhead very low. 

     

    The turn-key “Business Package” runs a cool $63,700, while those looking to buy one for personal use can knock five grand off of the price.

     

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    I say go for the monetization. Furthermore, going back to my earlier thought: I suggest you set one of these up near the Naval Special Warfare Groups base outside of Virginia Beach, post advertisements everywhere claiming you use the Tarzan Boat to train SEALs, and see what happens.

  • Forum Frenzy: A Sketching Exercise

    By Core77 on September 11, 2015
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    One of our long-time readers recently took to our Discussion Boards to document his sketching journey as he transitions from Engineering to the career he's always wanted in ID. As he uploads his daily progress (thumbs up for commitment!), the inspiring thread has built up a ton of great pointers from our readers, including this great tutorial from Michael DiTullo showing his sketching process using overlays.

    "The first sketch shows me just laying out the perspective and overall organization of all of the inputs on the product," he explains. At this point, it's all about getting "the perspective in place and laying out a rough placement of all the key features. There are 2 main groups. The keyboard, and then everything else. The visual hierarchy should tell that story "

    "Then, I start to sculpt the product and get the overall theme of the concept. I could have gone with a very rectilinear theme, which could be a totally viable solution. Likely it is the more appropriate, but for the sake of our learning journey I wanted to start pushing into some complex form. Here you can see how I start to sculpt away the shape."

    "Now that I have a sense for what the concept will be, I get a clean sheet and start cleaning up the lines. I'm laying in a lot more detail. I also noticed my keyboard looked a little short so I lengthened it. As a beginner this might be two steps, not one. I also used a straight edge to do the lower and upper lines of the keyboard area and the lower line of the controls area, but not on anything else. Everything else was short enough that I trusted myself. Notice the different levels of pen pressure. smaller details get very light pen strokes, they are less important. The more important larger ideas get heavier lines, and then a sharpie is brought in for an outline and shadow."

    "And finally, apply some quick marker to show off the concept: Cool grey 30%, 40%, 50% and a magenta marker."

    And the most important thing, as Michael reminds us, is to keep practicing: "Do that 30 times on the same idea and you are going to get some good stuff." Head over to the discussion boards for more sketching eye-candy—and maybe even to share your own tips and encouragement! 

  • Louis Sauzedde’s Clever Tricks for Restoring a Ruined Handsaw

    By Core77 on September 10, 2015
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    Louis Sauzedde got his hands on a ripsaw in truly horrific condition. As you can see in the photo below, it looks like this thing was tied to the back of a car and dragged down the Interstate:The teeth on the left have been fixed by Sauzedde, the teeth...
  • Winner of Honda’s Global Design Project is a Car/Motorcycle Mash-Up

    By Core77 on September 10, 2015
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    Each year Honda holds an internal design competition, pitting their various design studios against each other to create blue-sky concepts. The winner of this year's Honda Global Design Project is Project 2&4, created by two Honda teams that were ap...
  • Designs for Small Spaces: Transformable Coffee Tables

    By Core77 on September 10, 2015
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    I still remember the first time I saw a transformable coffee table, about a dozen years ago in a friends' home—a small place that definitely didn't have room for both a coffee table and a dining table. Now I see clients who struggle with making everything fit in a small home, and dual-purpose furniture can really help. 

    The Mascotte table from Calligaris, designed by Edi and Paolo Ciani, has a number of nice design features. The user just presses a button to select from one of seven heights—so it's extremely easy to adjust, and quite flexible. The tabletop size can be doubled; there's a butterfly opening mechanism for that. And the table has two scratch-resistant rubber wheels, so it's easy to move around.

    This video shows just how easy it is to adjust the Mascotte table. It can go from 42 cm to 74 cm (about 16.5 inches to 29 inches), which means it covers standard coffee table and dining table heights.

    The mechanism for adjusting the height is obviously a key design decision for such tables. The Paris table from Compar is raised and lowered using a pump mechanism. 

    Looking at this video, it seems the Paris table is easy to adjust, too—a smidgen more complex than the Marcotte, perhaps, but still no big deal.

    The Lem adjustable table from Magis, which first came out in 1985, was designed by Andries and Hiroko van Onck. They explain how it works: "By unclasping a simple grip under the table top the Lem table height can be adjusted from a coffee table to a dining table...a steelspring is loaded when the table is pushed in the lower position...The three injection molded polycarbonate 'feet' include each two ball joints." 

    In 2012 the table was redesigned, changing the central joint of the legs, so it looks a bit different. 

    Olsson & Gerthel, one of the many companies selling the table, explain that it's raised or lowered by turning the tabletop. This would seem to indicate the table can be adjusted to any height the end user wants (within the table's range of 43-73.5 cm), and some end users will appreciate that added flexibility.

    Sedit makes a number of transformable tables where the tabletop rises up from the base. In some of those tables, such as the Piccolo, the table incorporates a bit of storage—always helpful in small spaces.

    The Piccolo is another table that's very easy to open and close, as the video illustrates. However, it's also a table that's limited to two heights. That will be fine for most end users, but others will miss the flexible height options that some other tables provide.

    Other tables transform without any mechanical apparatus. One such table is the MK1 from Duffy London. This makes the adjustment a bit more complex—but I don't think I'd have any trouble with this table, and I'm no good at such things. It converts with "two simple movements" per Duffy London, and I could handle that. Still, this wouldn't be the table for certain end users with physical limitations. 

    The M-Table from Oito takes a somewhat similar design approach, with legs that pivot to raise or lower the table.

    The 3styletable is just what its name indicates; it can serve as a coffee table, a desk, or a dining table. This design requires the end user to reassemble five pieces into different configurations, making it a more complex transformation than most other such tables. It's still not very difficult, but it might not be something the end user would want to do on a daily basis.

    The height of the Vidun table from De Padova, designed by Vico Magistretti in 1987, is adjusted with the big wooden screw that forms the base. This particular table wouldn't work so well as a coffee table, though, since it only goes from 63 cm to 80 cm (about 25 inches to 31.5 inches).

  • A Look at What Apple’s Been Cooking

    By Core77 on September 10, 2015
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    Apple announced several new products at their media event yesterday. We'll start with the ones of most interest to the general consumer, the iPhone 6S and 6S Plus, which are pushing the UI boundaries with some new tricks. As we've all grown used to swi...
  • How to Quickly Carve Stone Using Cheap Tools

    By Core77 on September 10, 2015
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    When you think of working a material like stone, you imagine it taking forever, as you patiently tap away at it with a chisel and hammer. But Jesse de Geest, a/k/a the Samurai Woodworker, has an absurdly fast method for carving a sink out of granite, p...
  • Sexy Design Solutions for Utilizing “Blind Corner” Cabinet Space in the Kitchen

    By Core77 on September 9, 2015
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    If you're not an apartment dweller like me, and thus have a kitchen big enough to support an L-shaped counter, then you have another problem: The dead space in the "blind corner" where the two axes meet. Luckily for you, there are a host of design companies with solutions for how to utilize this otherwise wasted space.

    On the basic end, you've got Knape & Vogt's slide-out base blind corner unit:

    It gets a bit sexier with County Kitchens' "Magic Corner" solution:

    Waricorner's solution is similar if not identical, and their video gives you a better look at the mechanism:

    Haefele's "Lemans" system, so named because their solution is shaped like the famous racetrack, goes full-on sexy:

    This man is so excited to show this blind corner solution for drawers that he doesn't bother to mention the manufacturer (it's Germany's Blum):

    And if none of these are high-tech enough for you, then check out Q4 Home Solutions' appliance lift:

    Editor's Note: If you feel you've spotted some of these before on Core77, that's because you have—this is an updated version of an older post with some newer solutions added.

  • How to Make a Poor Man’s RAID Drive

    By Core77 on September 9, 2015
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    Have you been wanting to get a RAID drive for your personal computer, but aren’t willing to part with the cash? Have you been slowly amassing a pile of stolen flash drives from work to compensate for your unpaid overtime? If the answers to these questions are “Yes,” then we’ve got the solution for you.

    The YouTuber known as The iBookGuy wanted to know if he could rig up a RAID drive using nothing more than a USB hub and a handful of flash drives. If you’ve thought about doing this yourself, have a look at the pluses and minuses of this set-up:

    And yes, I know he used a 2.0 hub rather than a 3.0. But look at this as a proof-of-concept.